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Acne and rosacea

If you wake up to find a few large pimples on your otherwise clear face, you may consider that severe acne. Likewise, a breakout of whiteheads and blackheads before a first date may seem like severe acne. Learn More

Exercise and Sports

To remove sweat during a workout, use a clean towel and gently pat the sweat from your skin. Do you suspect that your workout is causing (or worsening) your acne? Learn More

Rosacea

Rosacea is a common skin condition, which can also affect your eyes. When rosacea develops in your eyes, it’s important to treat it. Learn More

Stubborn Acne

Pimple-like breakouts around the mouth: This may look like acne, but it’s actually a skin condition called perioral dermatitis — not acne. If you have acne that just won’t go away, you may want to take a closer look at your skin. It’s possible that you don’t have acne. Learn More

Teenage Acne

Having any type of acne (pimples, whiteheads, blackheads, or acne cysts) can feel devastating for a teenager. Just when our appearance becomes so important and we want to look our best, acne can begin. Some teens seem unfazed by acne. Learn More

Bumps and Growth

If a mole starts to grow, itch, or bleed, make an appointment to see a dermatologist. Moles: Overview Also called nevi Moles are common. Almost every adult has a few moles. Adults who have light skin often have more moles. They may have 10 to 40 moles on their skin. Learn More

Moles

Dermatologist examining a new mole. If you develop a new mole after age 30, a dermatologist should examine the mole for signs of melanoma. #1 problem with moles: Melanoma While most moles are harmless, you shouldn’t ignore yours. Melanoma, the most-serious skin cancer, can begin in a mole. Learn More

Mohs

Birthmarks

Birthmarks: Overview Salmon patches: This harmless birthmark will fade with time and tends to be most noticeable when your baby cries or becomes too warm. What exactly is a birthmark? Learn More

Scars

If you dislike the look of a scar, treatment may make it less noticeable. What exactly is a scar? When you injure your skin, your body naturally repairs the damage. How your body repairs this damage depends on how deeply the injury penetrates your skin. Learn More

Color Problems

Vitiligo: This skin disease often forms on both sides of the body as shown here on the knees. Vitiligo (vit-uh-lie-go) causes the skin to lose color. Patches of lighter skin appear. Some people develop a few patches. Others lose much more skin color. Learn More

Contagious Skin Diseases

It is common for warts to grow on the hands. Warts: Overview Warts are benign (not cancerous) skin growths that appear when a virus infects the top layer of the skin. Viruses that cause warts are called human papillomavirus (HPV). Learn More

Cold Sores

Cold sores are so contagious that many people catch the virus that causes them by the time they’re 5 years old. Also known as fever blisters or herpes simplex labialis. What is a cold sore? Learn More

Genital Herpes

 If your partner has genital herpes, you can catch it — even when your partner doesn’t have sores. Genital herpes: Overview What is genital herpes? Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease (STD). Learn More

Cosmetic Treatments

Cosmetic treatments may look easy. But knowing whether a treatment is safe for you and can deliver the results you want requires in-depth medical knowledge of the skin. Dermatologists have this unique training. Learn More

Cellulite Treatments

Most women, even very fit women, have cellulite — fat that causes the skin to dimple. If cellulite bothers you, you’re not alone. Our desire to get rid of — or at least diminish — cellulite has led to many treatment options. Learn More

Laser Treatment For Scars

After two pulsed-dye laser treatments from a board-certified dermatologist (B), this woman’s raised scar (A) is much less noticeable. A laser can seem like a magic wand that can make any scar disappear. Medical lasers, however, are nothing to play with. Learn More

Liposuction

Liposuction is a type of surgery used to remove fat. By removing a small amount of fat, it’s possible to reshape just about any area of the body. Learn More

Dry / Sweaty Skin

Simple changes can soothe dry skin Following the same skin care routine year round may not work so well when the humidity drops. Without a change in your skin care, dry air can make fine lines and wrinkles more noticeable. Dry skin can itch, flake, crack, and even bleed. Learn More

Eczema / Dermatitis

Severe stasis dermatitis on the lower leg and foot: Poor blood flow leads to these skin changes. Also called gravitational dermatitis, venous eczema, and venous stasis dermatitis This condition develops in people who have poor circulation. Learn More

Hair and Scalp Problems

Scalp psoriasis: When psoriasis forms on the scalp, it can creep beyond the scalp. Scalp psoriasis: Overview Psoriasis (sore-EYE-ah-sis) can appear anywhere on the skin. When it forms on the scalp, it is often called scalp psoriasis. Scalp psoriasis can extend beyond the scalp. Learn More

Itchy Skin

An allergy to a medicine can cause hives. Also called urticaria, hives are welts on the skin that often itch. These welts can appear on any part of the skin. Hives vary in size from as small as a pen tip to as large as a dinner plate. Learn More

Painful Skin / Joints

This type of scleroderma causes widespread patches of hard, thickened skin. What is scleroderma? When a person has scleroderma (sclare-oh-dur-muh), the body makes too much collagen. This excess collagen, the substance that holds our body together, causes hardening and tightening. Learn More

Rashes

This common skin disease causes patches on the skin. Your dermatologist may call the large patch a mother patch. The smaller patches are daughter patches. Learn More

Scaly Skin

Seborrheic dermatitis: Despite its appearance, this skin disease is not caused by poor hygiene. Seborrheic dermatitis: Overview This is a very common skin disease that causes a rash. When this rash appears, it often looks like the one pictured above. Learn More

Skin Cancer

Follow these tips to protect your skin from the damaging effects of sun exposure and reduce your risk of skin cancer: Apply sunscreen. When you are going to be outside, even on cloudy days, apply sunscreen to all skin that will not be covered by clothing. Learn More

Melanoma

Melanoma is the most serious type of skin cancer.  Allowed to grow, melanoma can spread quickly to other parts of the body. This can be deadly. There is good news. When found early, melanoma is highly treatable. Learn More

Skin, Hair, and Nail Care

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Skin Care

Keeping your skin healthy and looking its best doesn't necessarily mean breaking the bank if you follow these practical tips from leading dermatologists: Cleanse, treat, and prevent. Don't let a 12-hour period go by without using some sort of treatment or product on your skin (sunscreen counts). Learn More

Hair Care / Hair Loss

How you wash your hair and the products you use can go a long way toward maintaining smooth, shiny hair. Follow these simple tips from dermatologists to maintain healthy hair. Wash oily hair more frequently. How often you wash your hair should be based on how much oil your scalp produces. Learn More

Injured Skin

Whenever your skin is injured – whether by accident or from surgery – your body works to repair the wound. As your skin heals, a scar may form, as this is a natural part of the healing process. The appearance of a scar often depends on how well the wound heals. Learn More

Nail Care

Nails reflect our overall health, which is why proper nail care is so important. Here are dermatologists’ tips for keeping your nails healthy: Keep nails clean and dry. Cut nails straight across. Use sharp nail scissors or clippers. Round the nails slightly at the tips for maximum strength. Learn More

Anti Aging Skin Care

Skin care in your 40s and 50s Wrinkle creams, eye serums, and other anti-aging skin care products can help diminish signs of aging. To create a truly effective anti-aging skin care plan, however, it helps to start with healthy skin care habits. Learn More

Other Conditions

Diabetes can affect many parts of your body, including your skin. When diabetes affects the skin, it’s often a sign that your blood sugar (glucose) levels are too high.  Learn More

Videos

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Pamphlets

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Acne
Acne is the most frequent skin condition seen by medical professionals. It consists of pimples that appear on the face, back and chest. About 80% of adolescents have some form of acne and about 5% of adults experience acne. In normal skin, oil glands under the skin, known as sebaceous glands, produce an oily substance called sebum. Read More...

Moles (Nevi)
Moles are brown or black growths, usually round or oval, that can appear anywhere on the skin. They can be rough or smooth, flat or raised, single or in multiples. They occur when cells that are responsible for skin pigmentation, known as melanocytes, grow in clusters instead of being spread out across the skin. Generally, moles are less than one-quarter inch in size. Most moles appear by the age of 20, although some moles may appear later in life. Read More...

Psoriasis
Psoriasis is a skin condition that creates red patches of skin with white, flaky scales. It most commonly occurs on the elbows, knees and trunk, but can appear anywhere on the body. The first episode usually strikes between the ages of 15 and 35. It is a chronic condition that will then cycle through flare-ups and remissions throughout the rest of the patient's life. Psoriasis affects as many as 7.5 million people in the United States. About 20,000 children under age 10 have been diagnosed with psoriasis. Read More...

Rashes
"Rash" is a general term for a wide variety of skin conditions. A rash refers to a change that affects the skin and usually appears as a red patch or small bumps or blisters on the skin. The majority of rashes are harmless and can be treated effectively with over-the-counter anti-itch creams, antihistamines and moisturizing lotions.Read More...

Rosacea
Rosacea is a chronic skin condition that causes facial redness, acne-like pimples, visible small blood vessels on the face, swelling and/or watery, irritated eyes. This inflammation of the face can affect the cheeks, nose, chin, forehead or eyelids. More than 14 million Americans suffer from rosacea. It is not contagious, but there is some evidence to suggest that it is inherited. There is no known cause or cure for rosacea. There is also no link between rosacea and cancer.Read More...

Skin Cancers
Skin cancer is the most common form of human cancers, affecting more than one million Americans every year. One in five Americans will develop skin cancer at some point in their lives. Skin cancers are generally curable if caught early. However, people who have had skin cancer are at a higher risk of developing a new skin cancer, which is why regular self-examination and doctor visits are imperative. Read More...

Warts
Warts are small, harmless growths that appear most frequently on the hands and feet. Sometimes they look flat and smooth, other times they have a dome-shaped or cauliflower-like appearance. Warts can be surrounded by skin that is either lighter or darker. Warts are caused by different forms of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV). They occur in people of all ages and can spread from person-to-person and from one part of the body to another. Warts are benign (noncancerous) and generally painless.Read More...

Wrinkles
Wrinkles are a natural part of the aging process. They occur most frequently in areas exposed to the sun, such as the face, neck, back of the hands and forearms. Over time, skin gets thinner, drier and less elastic. Ultimately, this causes wrinkles - either fine lines or deep furrows. In addition to sun exposure, premature aging of the skin is associated with smoking, heredity and skin type (higher incidence among people with fair hair, blue-eyes and light skin). Read More...

Contact Us

 We encourage you to contact us whenever you have an interest or concerns.

Our phone number is (909) 313-5111

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Hours of Operation

Our Regular Schedule

Sand Dermatology

Monday:

8:00 AM-5:00 PM

Tuesday:

8:00 AM-5:00 PM

Wednesday:

8:00 AM-5:00 PM

Thursday:

8:00 AM-5:00 PM

Friday:

8:00 AM-5:00 PM

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed